Why ‘Krissed’ is the new ‘Rickrolled’

Beware of gullible TikTok users: you may be in danger of winning #Krissed.

The new trend is spreading by an application in which users publish videos, usually accompanied by false information about celebrities, which ends with a video of Chris Jenner dancing with an accelerated version of “Lady Marmalade” from “Moulin Rouge”.

Now a viral shot of Jenner in a glittery green dress and a black bow tie comes from an amateur music video on the set of the 2011 Kardashian-Jenners family Christmas card. Shipped to former Kendall and Kylie Jenner YouTube channel, the video now has more than 4.6 million views.

Meanwhile, the hashtag #Krissed is currently has over 229 million views on TikTok. At the end of the video, users often encourage their followers to joke with their friends and family.

One example, which garnered more than 7.7 million views, includes a photoshopped photo seemingly from Kendall’s Instagram network, claiming that the supermodel announced that she was pregnant. Before fans can even gather their thoughts, an 818 Tequila owner’s momager appears.

“Again, I was angry at how I kept falling for it,” a confused TikTok user commented.

“My therapist will hear about this,” said another.

Getting Krissed on TikTok
Fans of JoJo Siwe got “Krissed” on Wednesday when the pop star falsely announced she was temporarily retiring from public life.
@itsjojosiwa

JoJo Siwa used bait-and-switch tactics with its 41.7 million TikTok followers. On Wednesday, she falsely announced that she would take a break from public life before dancing Jenner took over the screen.

“There’s no way I just got Krissed from Jojo Siwa,” one user commented.

“I WROTE A SECTION OF HOW YOU DESERVE A NICE PAUSE AND AS SOON AS I SAW CHRIS I WAS 🤬,” admitted another.

Getting Krissed on TikTok
The trend is a bait-and-switch technique that attracts users with unusual false information and then tells them they were trolls with a recording of Kris Jenner singing and dancing.
@shesjustsadig

Some consider it a new trend a version of “Rickrolling” of this generation. If unknown, the phrase refers to people who have been tricked into clicking on a hyperlink that leads to a music video for Rick Astley’s 1987 hit. “I will never give up on you.” The clip has since reached more than 1 billion views on YouTube.

The post contacted Kris Jenner representatives for comment.

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