The best of the men’s SS23 at Milan Fashion Week: Moschino, Versace, Prada and Fendi

Hi, love! Indeed, after London comes Milan, and this season we were instructed in the abundance of top fashion at the city week of men’s clothing SS23. From the elevated norm to Prada to maximalist exuberance in Versacestrange visual word games JW Anderson to the rise of brave young talents such as Magliano, this was a season in which milan menswear – which can sometimes go wrong predictably – felt particularly diverse, with a sense of fresh creative energy felt in the air. Here we give you a complete description of what happened in the most posh city in Italy.

Emporio Armani SS23 Men's Review
Emporio Armani SS23 Men's Review
Emporio Armani SS23 Men's Review

Images courtesy of gorunway.com

Emporio Armani

One of the qualities that most distinctively characterized the SS23 menswear collections we’ve seen so far is the airy sense of optimism, a lightness that seems like a counterpoint to the peacock spirit we’ve seen so much in the SS22. That is what is characterized Emporio Armani, who delivered a collection that professionally follows the line between urban sophistication and carefree vacation. The sharpness of light woolen blazers was offset by liquid wide-leg pants that hovered at every turn, while vertical slopes and playfully pulled collars added a measure of the hot boy’s and summer’s sensuality to the mix. Craft sensibility informed from sky to sea-blue jacquards and prints that had a free feeling of spontaneous brushstroke, as well as moments of crocheting and difficult sailor knitwear, all of which are compensated by sports tracksuits in contrasting tones. Although the note on which the show is closed – a white male model with long dreadlocks, dancing across the runway with a reggae soundtrack – seemed a bit outdated, otherwise it was an eminently contemporary show for the summer ahead.

Fendi

Holidays. This is a topic you’ll probably hear a lot about during the SS23 season, with – as you’ve probably noticed if you’ve been at the airport lately – everyone seems to be caught en masse on traveling bugs. No less affected than all the rest of us, of course, are the designers, with the prospect that they no longer have to just dream of leaving, but will be able to do so, offering a rush of holiday clothes to start this new era of free travel. It was certainly a feeling that permeated Silvia Venturini’s collection of menswear Fendi presented today in Milan so glowing, that it felt like a tropical end in itself. “Approaching summer clothes as a way around the world to near and far vacation destinations”, as it is noted in the show, was the work permeated by the wind the joy of living. Squeaky jackets with long lines and lapels in sand-beige and Mediterranean blue were worn by bare-breasted boys who also wore louche, woolen trousers with wide legs and wide kaftan shirts decorated with needle floral embroidery that brought a cheerful splash of kitsch. Go here for a full review.

Jordanluca SS23 Men's Exhibition
Jordanluca SS23 Men's Exhibition
Jordanluca SS23 Men's Exhibition

Images courtesy of gorunway.com

Jordanluca

You could argue that self-sabotage is a fundamental human value. As we walk the path of life, we are the ones who most often set up obstacles. That was the point from which Jordan Bowden and Luca Marchetto left this season with their decadent mood collection called ‘Sabotage’. Inspired by Freud’s notion of the ‘death instinct’, a counter-intuitive impulse that drives us to make, as many would say, all wrong choices, the London publishing house has explored why we are all so compelled to screw things up for ourselves, like flaming moths. One thing the duo certainly didn’t screw up was the clothes themselves. The tailoring and outerwear were proportionately boxy and expertly crafted, with gigantic horizontal stripes running from sleeve to sleeve joined by gleaming metal zippers. Sometimes the pieces were shaped with open zippers, causing the sleeves to gape at the biceps. Elsewhere, the jeans were brutally upset, and the brand’s signature pants, slightly gothic silhouettes down, dragged across the floor, all serving as visual codes for the contemplative theme of the collection.

Versace

To clarify one thing: Versace it’s not just the brand – it’s the whole damn lifestyle! It is a fact that you soon realize when you attend one of the performances in the house, prepared in the spacious garden of the Milan Palace, which she calls home. While the usual group of journalists, customers and co. dropped out for its first men’s runway show in three years, the most prominent participants were hardened fans who appeared in full force, adorned from head to toe in decadent silk with printed Versace bold prints inspired by Greco-Roman signatures. Go here for a complete review!

Magliano SS23 Men's Exhibition
Magliano SS23 Men's Exhibition
Magliano SS23 Men's Exhibition

Images courtesy of gorunway.com

Magliano

Bringing fashion to the dilapidated building next to the municipal landfill on the outskirts of Milan at 10 am is, of course, a risky choice, but it is one that Luchino Magliano, the eponymous founder of one of Milan ‘s busiest menswear brands, was ready to accept. Fortunately, it paid off easily with his emotionally rich presentation among the most important events of this week. Along the glass runway set up in front of artistically assembled antique benches and chairs, an extremely diverse (especially for the notorious institutional Milan) team wandered and lingered in the dilapidated space, like ghosts from his past. The clothes they wore had a similar spectral impression as they did — the shirts were wrapped in satin and lined with twigs, or wrapped, tied, and randomly belted; the trousers had subtly accentuated proportions, and the oversized suit came down from the shoulders. The earthy palette of looks contributed to the quiet melancholy that seemed to dominate this season’s offer, although it would not be right to say that it culminated in a sense of gloom. Instead, what was on display here was a sure display of emotional rawness, something felt in the rough-hewn edges of the collection, hearty textures and clothing items such as a broken-heart souvenir sweater and blue jeans with knees stained by the ground. Milan isn’t necessarily a city known for its emerging talents, but Magliano is doing a damn good job proving why that might need to change.

Prada

Framing everything is in vogue – changing the context in which you see a particular look or garment can dramatically affect how you perceive it. It should have been mentioned that, when they entered the Fondazione Prada Deposit for the SS23 men’s clothing show, the guests were greeted by a huge room with white paper walls, accentuated by red curtain curtains in the djembe. Freed from distractions, he offered a clean, clean space for clothes to speak for itself. Read the full review here.

Moschino SS23 Men's Exhibition
Moschino SS23 Men's Exhibition
Moschino SS23 Men's Exhibition

Images courtesy of gorunway.com

Moschino

On the second day of Milan Men’s Fashion Week, Jeremy Scott encouraged a revival of the fashion illustration we’ve been seeing on runways lately, in a presentation honoring the life and work of artist and photographer Tony Viramontes. Best known for his bold, brilliant work of the early 80’s, as well as his contribution to Ray Petri Buffalo’s styling movement – a turning point in fashion history and a leading factor in shaping today’s fashion images – he sadly figures among a long list of precocious creatives lost to the AIDS crisis of the late 1980s, disappeared before they could enjoy the merits that belonged to them. Jeremy’s Moschino The collection of men’s clothes was, therefore, an attempt to posthumously give Tony his flowers and to present his work with fresh eyes. Drawing inspiration from the bold palettes of his work, the suit is cast in a series of rainbow shades, with techno-colored patterns and glittering embroideries of Tony’s illustrations. That camp feel was based on the rough punkness of leather bakery hats, wrap-up skirts and calf-lined boots, resulting in an appropriately extensive and belated toast to the legendary artist.

JW Anderson SS23 Men's Exhibition
JW Anderson SS23 Men's Exhibition
JW Anderson SS23 Men's Exhibition

Images courtesy of gorunway.com

JW Anderson

If something can be expected from a JW Anderson, it is, you guessed it, unexpected. As the undisputed fashion king of high madness – both in this eponymous label and in his tenure in Loewe – Jonathan nurtured a sense of combining a keen sensibility for luxury ready-to-wear clothing with the esotericism of the left field – access to very little of everything-except-the-kitchen sink. This season, at a delayed brand show in Milan, the scope of Jonathan’s object-driven approach expanded to sweaters with built-in skateboards that fired; striped sweaters tucked over ‘collars’ on the bike’s handlebars, for lack of a better description; the boxed T-shirts were cut with peeled openings on the lids and reattached with hinges on the doors. Although the girl of these wearable puns remained deliberately enigmatic – “Why?” the edition said, “only the spectator can say, and perhaps there is no reason for it” – but they were reinforced by a voluminous offer of clothing that had a clear meaning. Intriguingly disturbed marquetry sweater with distorted QR code motifs; sweaters and shoes with a “cheeky” self-portrait of Rembrandt, a Dutch old master; trompe l’oeil jersey slip dresses with cropped denim jeans applied to the upper half; and, in what will surely be instant bestsellers, glittering riffs on JW Anderson’s bumper bags.

Giorgio Armani SS23 Men's Review
Giorgio Armani SS23 Men's Review
Giorgio Armani SS23 Men's Review

Images courtesy of gorunway.com

Giorgio Armani

The opening of the last day of Men’s Fashion Week in Milan was one of the biggest city leaders – Giorgio Armani. For his latest collection for the branch of luxury menswear of his empire, he presented a collection that enjoyed the signatures of the 90’s house that Gen-Zers Hungry Archives is now rediscovering – a spacious, satin cut that conveys more sensual masculinity than many others. Italian suit. Louche, but structured silhouettes came in stone grays and soft skies and Mediterranean blue, and worn with finely knitted sweaters in geometric poppy patterns, while eccentric patterns on royal purple jackets and silk shirts with delicate prints of wood logos and giants.

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