Sudanese Situation Report, 20 June 2022 [EN/AR] – Sudan

Attachments

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Humanitarian partners plan to help about 33,000 people displaced by the Kulbus conflict.
  • Most of the affected families live in the open and have lost all their livestock and food supplies during the looting or burning of their villages.
  • A total of 77 children (49 boys and 28 girls) allegedly went missing, and five children (three boys and two girls) were killed during the conflict.
  • Partners will begin to respond as soon as the security situation allows. The coming rains risk interfering with the reaction because they will make the roads impassable.
  • A three-day inter-agency mission to Kulbus to assess additional villages left on June 20th.

EMERGENCIES

Conflict at Kulbus site, West Darfur, Situation Report no. 01 (20 June 2022)

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Humanitarian partners plan to help about 33,000 people displaced by the Kulbus conflict.

  • Most of the affected families live in the open and have lost all their livestock and food supplies during the looting or burning of their villages.

  • A total of 77 children (49 boys and 28 girls) allegedly went missing, and five children (three boys and two girls) were killed during the conflict.

  • Partners will begin to respond as soon as the security situation allows. The coming rains risk interfering with the reaction because they will make the roads impassable.

  • A three-day inter-agency mission to Kulbus to assess additional villages left on June 20th.

SITUATION OVERVIEW

Following the conflict between 6 and 11 June at Kulbus site in West Darfur, on 14 June the partners carried out an inter-agency assessment of Juruf and Kafani villages at Sirba site and Werywery and Adawi villages at Kulbus site where people took refuge. Humanitarian partners plan to help about 33,000 people (6,600 families) in these villages. Reports indicate that 25 villages were completely or partially burned and looted in the Dar Mukhtar administrative unit during the conflict.

Most of the affected families live in the open and have lost all their livestock and food supplies during the looting or burning of their villages; people survive on gifts and charities from the host community.

NEEDS

The assessed areas do not have access to improved water sources. Sanitary conditions are very poor in the areas of displacement, and the partners state that up to 97 percent of IDPs do not have access to sanitary facilities, which poses a risk of water contamination. Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) needs to be addressed before the rain, which risks making the situation worse. Humanitarian partners are facing a shortage of plastic film supplies. The possibility of purchasing stock locally is being explored to expedite the response.

Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) state that 25 percent of the displaced community eat one meal a day, and sometimes nothing.

A total of 77 children (49 boys and 28 girls) allegedly went missing, and five children (three boys and two girls) were killed during the conflict in the villages of Werywery, Kafani and Adawi. The partners said about 1,500 children have been affected by the conflict, 60 of whom have special needs. Children experience behavioral changes, including trauma, nightmares, and difficulty sleeping as a result of conflict. There are no active community child protection networks in all assessed locations. Women in locations such as Werywery reported being harassed and beaten during the initial relocation from their homes, and while collecting firewood and water.

Five schools at the estimated locations were damaged. IDPs occupied schools in Juruf, Werywery and Adawi, and three schools were looted. It is estimated that the total number of school-age children affected by the conflict is 1,738. In displaced areas, classrooms are overcrowded and lack educational materials and seats. There are no or bad WASH objects, resulting in an environment that is not conducive to learning. There has been an increased drop-out rate of displaced children, especially girls. School-age children in the villages of Juruf and Adawi will not be able to continue their education if IDPs who take refuge in schools do not leave before the start of the school year in September.

ANSWER

Partners will begin to respond as soon as the security situation allows. The coming rains risk interfering with the reaction because they will make the roads impassable. A three-day inter-agency mission to Kulbus to assess additional villages left on June 20th.

WFP plans to provide General Food Assistance (GFA) and Comprehensive Supplementary Nutrition Programs (BSFP) in all assessed areas.

Findings estimates

Werywery village

The community in Werywery reports that 1,744 families (about 2,720 people) currently live in the village, including 2,250 people (450 families) who are originally from the area. The priority needs of IDPs are food, shelter and non-food items (S / NFI), protection, water and health services. New IDPs live outdoors. 24 people were reported missing and 1,000 people lost their documents. Most of the affected families are women-run households, and some children do not have clothes. 30 children (24 boys and six girls) from Werywery disappeared, and three children (one boy and two girls) unaccompanied, one of whom lost her mother during the conflict. The partners identified about 500 people with specific needs.

There are no health or nutrition services in the area, and the nearest nutrition center is located in Um Kidedi, about 24 kilometers (km) away. People from Werywery had access to health services in Saraf Omri (70 km) or in the city of Ag Geneina in western Darfur (112 km). The main diseases reported in this area are diarrhea, cough / acute respiratory infections (ARI) and eye infections. Medium upper arm screening (MUAC) performed on 51 children and six pregnant and lactating women (PLWs) identified 12 children under the age of five with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). The global acute malnutrition rate (GAM) is 21.8 percent.

Juruf village

About 2,100 people (420 families) live in the village of Juruf, and another 2,500 people (495 families) affected by the conflict in Kulbus have taken refuge in the village. The priority needs of new IDPs are food, S / NFIs, water and health services.

The newcomers took refuge in the Rapid Support Force (RSF) camp, school and the host community.

There are 15 children in the village of Juruf who are separated from their guardians and families. There are no food services in the area, and the nearest food center is in Mastriha (20 km), but the road to get there is not safe due to uncertainty. There is an ambulance in the village, with one nurse and five trained midwives, but there is no ambulance. The main diseases reported in this area are smallpox, diarrhea and cough. MUAC screening conducted for 61 children under the age of five and 14 people living with HIV identified two cases of severe acute malnutrition (SAM), nine cases of MAM, and one PLW was malnourished. The GAM rate is 14.6 percent.

The village of Kafani

On June 9, armed Arabs attacked the village of Kafani, killing Umda (community leader) and a three-year-old girl. The village was looted and one house was burned. About 1,500 people (300 families) in the village fled to the village of Juruf, but returned between June 12 and 13 after the deployment of government security forces in the areas. Priority needs are food, water and health care.

Security forces seized a school in the village of Kafani. The existing hand pump does not work. There is no food center in Kafanija, and the nearest center is in the village of Tombasi (3 km), but it does not function due to insecurity. A partner MUAC screening conducted three weeks before the assessment on 13 children and five people living with HIV identified three children with MAM and a GAM rate of 16.7 percent.

village kideda

A police station was attacked and looted in the village of Um Kideda, and four police officers were killed. Assistance is needed to restore basic protection services.

Adawi village

The village of Adawi has a population of 500 people (150 families) and another 3,000 people (600 families) have found refuge in the village. Priority needs are food, S / NFI, protection, water and health services. The village has a functional health clinic that provides services to new IDPs and the host community. Services include counseling, treatment, reproductive health and immunization. The clinic employs trained community health workers, a certified midwife and a trained vaccinator. There are no essential health products or diagnostic tools in stock. The most commonly reported diseases are ARI and diarrhea. On June 13, the State Ministry of Health (SMoH) sent UNICEF and WHO health supplies to the clinic.

No catering services are available in this area. The host community previously had access to food services in the village of Um Kideda (about 10 km away), which was burned during the conflict. MUAC screening conducted for 32 children under the age of five and nine people living with HIV identified three children with SAM, eight with MAM, four malnourished PLWs, and a GAM rate of 34.4 percent.

The existing hand pump in the villages is not working. The partners report that 47 children (25 boys and 22 girls) from the village of Adawi went missing after the conflict.

* For more information read *Sudan: Conflict in Kulbus, West Darfur. Flash update no. 01 (June 14, 2022) [EN/AR]

Disclaimer

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
To learn more about OCHA activities, visit https://www.unocha.org/.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.