Guy Sebastian’s case highlights the love and hate relationship between stars and managers

For many stars, their old managers may remain in their books for many years after they divorced.

Indeed, it is one such long-term relationship that provides a critical story in the new Elvis blockbuster Base Luhrmann, who has entered into an extremely toxic relationship between Presley and a man focused on the then naive young emerging star, the backbone and manipulative Colonel Tom Parker, played by Tom Hanks.

Colonel Parker (left) talks to TV presenter Ed Sullivan while Elvis is grooming behind the scenes on Sullivan 's October 1956 television show.

Colonel Parker (left) talks to TV presenter Ed Sullivan while Elvis is grooming behind the scenes on Sullivan ‘s October 1956 television show.credit:

Many blame the greed of the late Parker for ultimately stifling Presley’s success and legacy, hiring him to make mediocre films and an endless stay in Las Vegas, for which Parker took 50 percent of the singer’s earnings.

According to Taylor Swift, Los Angeles super manager Scooter Brown is something of a modern-day Colonel Parker.

In 2019, Swift accused Brown on social media of years of “continuous, manipulative harassment” after revealing that he had bought the original “masters” of her music recordings, which she then re-recorded, effectively reducing the original’s revenue. the recordings would generate and claim revenue for themselves.

Taylor Swift and Scooter Brown, who bought Big Machine Records and acquired Swift's master recordings.

Taylor Swift and Scooter Brown, who bought Big Machine Records and acquired Swift’s master recordings.credit:AP

Two years later Brown claimed that the masters were originally offered to Swift to redeem them, but the offer was rejected.

As for the fact that the global superstar has publicly labeled him a “bully,” he said Diversity: “I am firmly against ever being mistreated. I always try to lead with respect and understanding. The only thing I’m most proud of at the moment is that my artists and team stood by me. They know my character and my truth. That meant a lot to me. In the long run, I am happy that my life’s work is a legacy that I leave behind. “

Brown flew to Sydney last weekend in search of another up-and-coming star: Charlton Howard, an 18-year-old Sydney musician known worldwide as The Kid Laroy.

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Last Saturday, I wrote about how Howard’s mother, Sloan, has effectively led her son’s extraordinary career since he was a little boy.

However, when the title – euphemistically – called her “boss”, the seemingly benign expression caused inexplicable confusion within the performer’s internal “team”.

It also turned out that the journalists who interviewed the teenager were not allowed to ask about the “revolving doors” of the managers who worked with him during his short three years in the spotlight.

Then, a day after my story was published, it was revealed that one of those former managers, Daniel “Zig” Annor, had filed a lawsuit against Howard and his mother in Supreme Court, accusing the singer of violating the contract when Annor’s management ceased a few days . before Howard signed a recording contract with Sony.

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Howard and his mother were silent about the lawsuit, the moment of which cast a shadow over the young performer’s otherwise triumphant return to Australia for his sold-out concert tour.

Maybe it was the fictional Hollywood manager Ari Gold from the cult show Entourage who best summed up a strange job from real life: “No one is happy in this city except the losers. Look at me, I’m pathetic. That’s why I’m rich. “

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